Mullins Memorial Funeral and Cremation Cape Coral
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Funeral and Cremation Questions & Answers

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  1. What are your fees for funeral and cremation services?
  2. How much does cremation cost?
  3. How much does a funeral cost?
  4. Do I have to be embalmed?
  5. What is the purpose of embalming?
  6. Who am I to call first when my loved one passes away (after calling all family that need to know)?
  7. What does "personalization of memorial service or funeral" mean?
  8. What are some do's and dont's regarding the memorial service, visitation or funeral?
  9. When is visitation over?
  10. Can we choose when the service will be scheduled?
  11. What times are you available to meet? Holidays? After Hours? Weekends?
  12. If additional staff is needed at service due to number of guest will there be an additional staff fee?
  13. Will there be a fee for transporting flowers?
  14. Will there be an additional charge for transporting our loved one from the place of death because: Their size requires additional staff and equipment? It's a holiday?
  15. Can I bring cremated remains on a plane?
  16. Can I transport a coffin with deceased on a plane?

What are your fees for funeral and cremation services?
For your convenince we provide a list of our funeral and related services in PDF format. You will find our prices very competitive for comparable services. Click here to view funeral service fees.

How much does cremation cost?
This often-asked question is usually answered by saying, "It all depends." It depends upon what type of service in connection to the cremation a family prefers. According to Federated Funeral Directors of America, the average cost of a basic, direct or simple cremation (same service different name) in the state of Florida in February 2011 was about $2,659.07. The cost of cremation "depends" upon what type of cremation container is selected, type of urn as well as whether or not a service with the body present or without is selected. Since there is a wide range of prices for alternative containers as well as urns, it is not always easy to give an exact answer to "what does cremation cost?" Also, when determining the cost of a cremation, there are a couple of other factors to consider: Cash advanced items-which are monies that families often ask the funeral director to pre-pay to others, as a courtesy, on the family's behalf. These might include, but are not limited to-flowers, paid obituaries, death certificates, marker dates as well as honorariums to preachers, musicians, and hairdressers.

How much does a funeral cost?
This often-asked question is also usually answered by saying, "It all depends." It depends upon what type of funeral you want or need. According to Federated Funeral Directors of America, the average cost of a regular adult funeral (services plus casket) in February 2011 was about $6,549. In addition, the average outer burial container (e.g. concrete boxes or vaults) sold for about $1251. (Though outer burial containers are not required by law-many cemeteries require one for maintenance reasons.) The cost of a regular adult funeral mainly "depends" upon what type of casket and outer burial container you choose. Since there is a wide range of prices with these two items, it is not always easy to give an exact answer to "what does a funeral cost?" Also, when determining the cost of a funeral, there are a couple of other factors to consider: One, for those families choosing burial there is the cost of the grave and the cost to open and close the grave. Or if you choose a mausoleum tomb there is the cost of the crypt and the cost to open and close the crypt. Two, cash advanced items--which are monies that families often ask the funeral director to pre-pay to others, as a courtesy, on the family's behalf. These might include, but are not limited to-flowers, paid obituaries, death certificates, marker dates as well as honorariums to preachers, musicians, and hairdressers.

Do I have to be embalmed?
Every funeral home is mandated by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) to disclose to everyone who inquires about embalming that embalming is not required by law, except in certain cases. Those exceptions might include when transporting the deceased over the state line or to another country, if the deceased is to be held for a certain period of time or if the person has a reportable contagious disease. In addition, most funeral homes (like Mullins Memorial) have a policy that if the family is planning for a public visitation with the casket opened, then they will require that embalming is done. Families usually have the right to choose an arrangement which does not require embalming, such as direct cremation or immediate burial (usually within 48 hours after death). When embalming is not done, and there is an immediate burial, many funeral homes will allow for a short viewing of the deceased just for the immediate family. One final note: Funeral homes are required to receive oral or written permission to embalm in which there would be a charge.

What is the purpose of embalming?
In "The Principles And Practices Of Embalming" it states: The primary duty of the embalmer is to disinfect, preserve, and restore the dead reverently and efficiently so that the health of the public will be protected against disease, the grief of the survivors will be lessened, and the dignity of the dead will be maintained. To expand upon that answer...
  • To disinfect so that if a person dies with a contagious disease, the disease might be neutralized and not be a health risk factor for family or friends who come in close proximity to the deceased during the visitation and funeral.
  • To preserve by often slowing down the natural decomposition process providing an extended period of time between death and the final disposition (e.g. burial) allowing time for a dignified funeral service.
  • To restore by often enhancing the person's appearance as opposed to how they might have looked at death.


Who am I to call first when my loved one passes away (that is, after calling all family that need to know)?
  • If a person dies at a hospital or a nursing home, when those facilities are ready, you usually may go ahead and call the funeral home first.

  • If a person dies at home and is under hospice care, the family should call hospice first. After they arrive, the hospice worker or family will then usually go ahead and call the funeral home.

  • If a person dies at home and they are not under hospice care, the medical examiner should be contacted first.

  • If a person dies under tragic circumstances (e.g. car accident, murder, etc.,), you should call 911.

  • If a person dies away from home (e.g. in another state), the above information would still be correct. If you don't know a funeral home in that area, you may want to want to contact your funeral home back home.

  • If a person dies outside of the U.S., you should contact their local law enforcement officials to determine the next course of action.


What does "personalization of memorial service or funeral" mean?
Personalizing one's final service simply means that you are making choices for a memorial or funeral that reflects something about whom the deceased was and what you wish to see happen at the service. Funerals and memorial services should not be "cookie-cutter" but they should, in some small but meaningful fashion, tell the story of one's life. Here are a few ways people personalize their funerals or memorial services: Certain music played; Whom to speak at the service; Type of clothing for the deceased; pallbearers selected; items to place in and around the casket; Favorite Bible verse or poem for memorial folders; favorite auto displayed at the service site; photos of the deceased in every aspect of life; favorite memorabilia on display such as fishing rods or golf clubs or even a motorcycle. This list is not meant to be all inclusive but serve only as a guide to assist. Ultimately, there is no right or wrong way to handle the personalization as long as the family is in agreement and it is in done in good taste.

What are some do's and dont's regarding the memorial service, visitation or funeral?
  • Do go. There is almost nothing more comforting to a family than people showing up at the funeral to pay their respects. It validates that a life has been lived and the life touched others.

  • Do introduce yourself, if necessary.

  • Do say something like, "I'm so sorry." or "I respected your father." or "I'll miss your grandmother." or "Your sister was so good to me." Honest comments are received the best.

  • Do offer the family any assistance you may give.

  • Do view the deceased, if you feel comfortable. In most cases, it is emotionally healthy to see the deceased lying in the casket.

  • Do bring children, unless their presence is a harmful distraction.

  • Do send flowers, bring food, or make a donation to the family's designated charity or memorial fund, if you choose.

  • Do sign the register book.
  • Don't be afraid to embrace the family with a hug or handshake.

  • Don't give advice, unless the family asks.

  • Don't be too quick to give pious platitudes like "It's all for the best" or "I know how you feel" or "It must have been God's will" or "At least she is not suffering anymore."

  • Don't ask what the cause of death was.

  • Don't call to talk to the family during visitation, unless you are out-of-town.

  • Don't be in a rush. Take time to reminisce about the deceased, listen, and spend time with the family--unless the line is long.
When is visitation over?
Visitation times are scheduled to provide a basic time frame for the gathering, but families often find that they want to continue visiting with their guests for an hour or more after the visitiation is scheduled to end. This is encouraged by our staff and there is no additional charge for the extra time.

Can we choose when the service will be scheduled?
Funeral services are scheduled for the convenience of the family, and although the funeral home may need to hire additional vehicles or staff for additional services on the same day, the wishes of the family will be accomodated without additional charge or comment.

What times are you available to meet? Holidays? After Hours? Weekends?
We meet with families when and where it is convenient for them whether this means meeting after hours or at whatever location meets the needs of the family. There is no additional charge for this service.

If additional staff is needed at service due to number of guest will there be an additional staff fee?
Large funerals require additional staff and equipment to run smoothly, but this charge is not passed on to the family.

Will there be a fee for transporting flowers?
We move flowers from the chapel, to church, to the graveside, to the family home, and to nursing homes and hospice at the request and for the convenience of the family without additional charge.

Will there be an additional charge for transporting our loved one from the place of death because: Their size requires additional staff and equipment? It's a holiday?
Death takes place at any time, and the transport of the deceased can be complicated by many factors including time and location. We are available 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, and promise to be patient, compassionate, helpful and discreet. The long hours we work are never a topic of our conversation with a family. The director may have been up all night working, may have another arrangement to make soon, or may spend extra hours past a scheduled service or visitation, but when meeting with you, their focus is on your needs, not theirs.

Can I bring cremated remains on a plane?
We understand how painful losing a loved one is, and we respect anyone traveling with crematory remains. Passengers are allowed to carry a crematory container as part of their carry-on luggage, but the container must pass through the X-ray machine. If the container is made of a material that generates an opaque image and prevents the Transportation Security Officer from clearly being able to see what is inside, then the container cannot be allowed through the security checkpoint.

Out of respect to the deceased and their family and friends, under no circumstances will an officer open the container even if the passenger requests this be done. Documentation from the funeral home is not sufficient to carry a crematory container through security and onto a plane without screening.

You may transport the urn as checked baggage provided that it is successfully screened. We will screen the urn for explosive materials/devices using a variety of techniques; if cleared, it will be permitted as checked baggage only.

Some airlines do not allow cremated remains as checked baggage so please check with your air carrier before attempting to transport a crematory container in checked baggage.

Crematory containers are made from many different types of materials, all with varying thickness. At present, we cannot state for certain whether your particular crematory container can successfully pass through an X-ray machine. However, we suggest that you purchase a temporary or permanent crematory container made of a lighter weight material such as wood or plastic that can be successfully X-rayed. We will continue to work with funeral home associations to provide additional guidance in the future

Can I transport a coffin with deceased on a plane?
Please check with air carrier to determine their policies and procedures.

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